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Educators often feel the need to engage students in their lessons in addition to educating while also adhering to set content standards and maneuvering around an ever-changing schedule. Writing great lesson plans is not often an easy task so what do educators do when they reach writer’s block? Matt Miller from Ditch That Textbook offers the following tips for overcoming writer’s block (source). 

  1. Think back on your best lessons: consider your favorite lessons or lessons that went well and use the same ideas on your new lesson.
  2. Be proactive: being creative is difficult on-demand. Begin keeping a journal of great ideas so that when you feel stuck you can look at the journal for inspiration. 
  3. Take a walk: take a quick break to walk or exercise. Exercising improves brain activity which might produce exciting ideas. 
  4. Get inspiration: I am always inspired by the work of other educators. You can be inspired by the work of other educators by visiting their classrooms or by browsing through vetted social media and websites. 
  5. Brain dump: write down all the ideas you have about a certain lesson while also answering questions about the lesson you want to teach: content to cover, what excites students, etc. 

You can see these tips and more by viewing 10 Tips for Lesson Planning Writer’s Block by Matt Miller. 

References:

All sourced information is hyperlinked as applicable above. 

TLDR (too long didn’t read):

Educators often feel the need to engage students in their lessons in addition to educating while also adhering to set content standards and maneuvering around an ever-changing schedule. Writing great lesson plans is not often an easy task so what do educators do when they reach writer’s block? Matt Miller from Ditch That Textbook offers the following tips for overcoming writer’s block (source). 

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